Humanities

If you're seeking a liberal education, you may wish to investigate a variety of disciplines in the humanities, without majoring exclusively in any one of these disciplines. The interdisciplinary major in humanities provides broad exposure to these various disciplines. The humanities include the following disciplines: art, biblical and theological studies, English, Spanish, history, music, philosophy, theatre and speech. Courses that do not count toward a department’s major cannot count toward the humanities major.

Humanities department homepage

Major requirements

Primary humanities discipline: 27-28
Choose 27-28 credits from one primary discipline; courses must be selected from the following list.
Secondary humanities discipline: 12
Choose 12 credits from one secondary discipline; courses must be selected from the following list.
Electives: 12
Choose 12 credits in humanities from courses other than your chosen primary or secondary discipline; courses must be selected from the following list.

Total credits required: 51-52

Art as primary discipline

ART 120AE - Art History Survey, Prehistoric Through Medieval
(4 credits, alternate years, consult department)(IGE option under Aesthetic Experience) This course provides a survey of art from the Prehistoric through Medieval periods. Students will study the development of artists and artistic styles by examining key visual works and pertinent social, political, and philosophical ideas and events. Through written responses, discussions, and projects, students will explore the impact of art from this time period, and learn how to articulate thoughts clearly and tactfully.
ART 122 - Art History Survey, Renaissance Through Early 20th Century
No course description available.
ART 206 - Drawing
(4 credits)Drawing will emphasize learning how to perceive the three- dimensional world and render it on paper using the most simple and direct drawing media. Drawing will form the foundation of work in other media. Design fundamentals will be a significant part of the course. A fee is associated with this course.
ART 215 - Ceramics
(4 credits) The art of working with clay and other ceramic materials. Emphasis will be upon learning the fundamentals of three-dimensional design and achieving an understanding of clay as a unique art form. Techniques include hand-building sculptural and functional f orms, and learning the basics of throwing on the wheel and glazing. A fee is associated with this course.
ART 217 - Sculpture
No course description available.
ART 244 - Painting
Introduces students to the techniques of oil, acrylic and water color painting. Students will learn to understand compositional form and color relationships. Historical examples of painting are examined and different methods of painting are demonstrated. Class critiques are used to learn formal vocabulary and achieve an understanding of subject style and content in painting. Note: A fee is associated with this course. (4 credits)
ART 342 - Printmaking
(4 credits) This course will provide an introduction to the foundational printmaking techniques of: intaglio, lithography, relief, and monotype. Demonstrations and individual assistance will help you gain technical proficiency, while in-class discussions and critiques will help you cultivate unique visual ideas. Reading assignments and responsive essays will allow you to consider questions inherent in printmaking and hone your ability to put visual phenomena into words. Note: A fee is associated with this course.

Total credits required: 28

English as primary discipline

English electives 8
Choose one course: 4
ENG 225 - Literature of the Developing World
To paraphrase Salman Rushdie, the Empire has written back. The last half of the 20th century has produced a number of literary texts written in English by authors from the recently independent nations of the Old British Empire. These texts have proved so rich in both literary value and cultural context that their authors, Wole Soyinka, Derek Walcott, Chinua Achebe, and Rushdie himself, have won the most prestigious literary prizes available. We will be reading and appreciating these books, both as ripping good yarns, and as significant cultural documents that teach us much of how members of other societies think, feel, and act. Prerequisite: ENG250LC. (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
ENG 238AE - Literature and Film
Literature and film is an introduction to the art of adaptation. Although we are frequent viewers of film, we are not always good readers and interpreters of visual texts. We will read original literary texts and view adaptations. Through class discussion, writing, and practice students will learn the visual language of film and understand the nature of adaptation. (4 credits) (NWCore option under Aesthetic Experience)
ENG 350 - Reading and Writing Short Fiction
Students will explore the nature and design of fiction by studying and analyzing a range of short fictional genres, learning to read fiction the way its writers read it, and participating in a fiction writing workshop. Attention will be given to purposes of language, to relationships between reading and writing, and to narrative as a mode of thinking and an expression of culture. Prerequisite: ENG292 or permission of instructor. (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
ENG 352 - Reading and Writing Poetry
Students will actively explore the nature and design of poetry by studying a range of poetic genres and styles, learning to read poetry as writers do, and writing poetry in a writing workshop. Attention will be given to the purposes of language, to relationships between reading and writing, and to poetry as a mode of thinking and an expression of culture. Prerequisite: ENG292 or permission of instructor. (4 credits; alternate years, consult department)
Choose one course: 4
ENG 346 - American Literature I
A study of prose and poetry in the United States from America's beginnings through the end of the Civil War. The course will focus on the works of Colonial and Romantic writers and the literatures of Native and African Americans. Special attention will be given to defining the qualities and concerns that make this literature distinctively "American." Prerequisite: ENG250LC. (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
ENG 347 - American Literature II
A study of prose and poetry in the United States from the Civil War until the present. The course will study works by realists (including regionalists) and modernists, as well as contemporary writers. Prerequisite: ENG250LC. (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
ENG 385 - Literature of Place
Some writers are especially interested in the ways people transform places and the ways places influence people. The elements of a place--the mountain ranges, shopping malls, grasslands, forests, migratory patterns of animals, rush of automobiles, or the portals of cyber-places-- shape the imagination. This course examines significant literary works, especially non-fiction, that explore the relationship between persons and places. In particular, we will examine the tension between the writer's need to construct definitions of "home places" and how the places themselves respond to human "home making." Prerequisite: ENG250LC (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
ENG 386 - The Other America
America is home to a variety of peoples and literatures; this course focuses on the development of literatures produced by those outside the Anglo-European tradition whose experiences tell a different story about America. The goal of the course is to enrich students' views of the content of American Literature and to familiarize them with a culture or cultures with which they may not be conversant. The course may be taught as African American, Native American, Asian American, or Hispanic American literature. Alternatively, the instructor may choose to focus on literatures in contact and conflict with one another, for example, the turbulent confluence of Native American, Anglo, and Hispanic Literatures of Nueva España. Note: See the instructor for the specific offering before enrolling. This course may be taken more than once, provided a different literature is studied. Prerequisite: ENG250LC (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
Choose one course: 4
ENG 375 - Early British Literature
(4 credits, alternate years, consult department) A journey through ten centuries of British literature, from the Middle Ages through the Renaissance, culminating in the great Christian epic, Milton's Paradise Lost. Prerequisite: ENG250LC.
ENG 378 - English Nineteenth-Century Literature
The industrial revolution resulted in an urbanized, more literate population. Writers of the time sought to reach a popular audience in a way unparalleled in English literary history. We shall read Austen, Wordsworth, Dickens, Eliot and their contemporaries, examining what they thought of and had to say to the common people of their day. Prerequisite: ENG250LC. (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
ENG 379 - English Twentieth-Century Literature
England was largely depopulated of young men and nearly reduced to rubble by two world wars. The nation that arose, stripped of its empire, has continued to be a literary center. We shall read Shaw, Yeats, Eliot, Heaney and others, examining how they have analyzed and expressed the modern human condition. Prerequisite: ENG250LC. (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
Choose one course: 4
ENG 345 - Linguistic Perspectives on English
In this course, we learn the rudiments of language study, trace the history of English, and gain a rigorous appreciation for the power of words. We follow the English language from its origin in a warlike Germanic tribe to its present state as the dominant medium of international communication. We learn the historical reasons for our irregular spelling and enormous lexicon. We sample varieties of English across America and throughout the world. Along the way, we learn to read basic Old and Middle English, challenge common assumptions about the nature of language, and confront the devastation of the world's linguistic ecology. (4 credits; alternate years, consult department)
ENG 401 - History and Theory of Rhetoric
Designed to provide solid grounding in Greek and Roman rhetorical theory and practice including studies in pre-literate rhetoric and the theories of Aristotle and Plato, among others. Some attention is also given to the Christianizing of rhetorical theory during the Middle Ages. Finally, the course concludes with the examination of trends in contemporary rhetoric studies and topical applications. Prerequisite: junior class standing, ENG235 recommended. Note: Specific subject matter will vary from year to year and might include such topics as a literary period, a national literature, a specific author, or literary genre. This course may be taken more than once provided a different topic is studied. (4 credits; alternate years, consult department)
ENG 480 - Special Topics in Literature and Culture*
In this seminar we analyze interpretive problems in literature and their relation to cultural theories and conditions. Particular attention is given to questions germane to Christian experience and thought. (4 credits, non-yearly, consult department)
Choose four credits: 4
ENG 380 - Special Topics in Writing
Specific subject matter of this course will vary from semester to semester, but will always focus on an issue in composition studies or a genre of writing. Courses will include both readings and student writing within the genre and will be designed to welcome both majors and non-majors. Note: The course may be taken more than once as long as the topic of study is different. Prerequisite: ENG290WI or ENG292 or permisson of the instructor. (2-4 credits)
ENG 387 - Special Topics in Rhetoric
Specific subject matter of this course will vary from semester to semester, but will always focus on an issue in rhetorical studies or a genre of writing. Courses with writing as their emphasis will include both readings and student writing within the genre. Note: The course will be designed to welcome both majors and non-majors. The course may be taken more than once as long as the topic of study is different. (2-4 credits, non-yearly, consult department)
ENG 480 - Special Topics in Literature and Culture*
In this seminar we analyze interpretive problems in literature and their relation to cultural theories and conditions. Particular attention is given to questions germane to Christian experience and thought. (4 credits, non-yearly, consult department)

Total credits required: 28

Note:

* This course has varying subject matter and may be taken twice; the humanities major with English as the primary discipline must take it at least once.

History as primary discipline

History electives 4
HIS 150 - Introduction to Historical Inquiry
An introduction to the principles and techniques involved in the study of history. This course will include both reflection and practice, consideration of ideas and actual application, through exercises drawing on primary and secondary materials.Prerequisite: HIS101.(2 credits)
HIS 206 - History of the United States
No course description available.
HIS 207WI - Europe and the Modern World
No course description available.
HIS 365 - Seminar in American History
(4 credits)(American history) Building on the skills students developed in the Colloquium in American history, the Seminar in American history invites students to do the work of a historian. Seminars focus more deeply on some period or issue or question, and students will write a significant research paper related to the seminar topic that demonstrates advanced familiarity with the historiography and advanced skills at analyzing and using primary sources. Note: This course may be taken more than once provided a different topic is studied. Prerequisite: HIS206 or permission of instructor.
HIS 375 - Seminar in European/World History
(4 credits)(European/world history) Building on the skills students developed in the Colloquium in European / World history, the Seminar in European/World history invites students to do the work of a historian. Seminars focus more deeply on some period or issue or question, and students will write a significant research paper related to the seminar topic that demonstrates advanced familiarity with the historiography and advanced skills at analyzing and using primary sources. Prerequisite: HIS 207 or permission of instructor.
HIS 435SR - Philosophy of History and Historiography
A study of problems relevant to history as a scientific and humanistic discipline. Among the questions considered are the following: What sorts of meaning have philosophers of history ascribed to the overall process of history? What approaches have historians taken to questions of objectivity, causation, and moral values in the study of history? How does philosophy of history relate to the Christian faith? Prerequisite: HIS 120HP or a NWCore Belief and Reason (BR) course. (4 credits)(European/world history)
HIS 436 - The Research Seminar
(2 credits)(American or European/world history) The Research Seminar permits students to develop, research, write and defend a major essay of original historical research on a topic of their choice. This course is the culmination of their major and builds on training and writing completed in the earlier history courses. They will work closely with one member of the history department, but the others will contribute to their work by reading and commenting on drafts. The student will defend and discuss their thesis in a public setting. Prerequisite: HIS435.

Total credits required: 28

Music as primary discipline

Class or private instruction 2
Ensemble participation 2
Music electives 5
MUS 111 - Music Theory I
This course will teach the fundamentals necessary for performing, composing/arranging, teaching, directing, writing about, and recording/producing music. Related topics such as music history, performance practice and music technology are also explored and an in-depth study is made of the Christian perspective on music and music-making.Prerequisite for 111: MUS101 or passing score on diagnostic placement exam.(2 credits)
MUS 112 - Music Theory II
This course will teach the fundamentals necessary for performing, composing/arranging, teaching, directing, writing about, and recording/producing music. Related topics such as music history, performance practice and music technology are also explored and an in-depth study is made of the Christian perspective on music and music-making.Prerequisite for 112: MUS111 or passing score on diagnostic placement exam.(4 credits)
MUS 318WI - History of Music II
No course description available.
MUS 319 - History of Music III
No course description available.
Choose one course: 3-4
MUS 211 - Music Theory III
This course will teach the fundamentals necessary for performing, composing/arranging, teaching, directing, writing about, and recording/producing music. Related topics such as music history, performance practice and music technology are also explored and an in- depth study is made of the Christian perspective on music and music-making.(4 credits)
MUS 317 - History of Music I
No course description available.
Choose one course: 2
MUS 301 - Basic Conducting
This course is designed to assist students in developing a basic conducting technique. Skills are taught which enable the student to direct vocal and instrumental groups. Included in the course are studies in transposition, clef reading and score preparation.Prerequisite: MUS112.(2 credits, alternate years, consult department)
MUS 320CC - World Musics
(3 credits, alternate years, consult department)(IGE option under Cross-Cultural Engagement) Music is an integral part of every culture. By studying the music of other cultures, including the way music relates to faith, power, societal structure, and daily life, students will be able to better understand, love, and treat people from other cultures with justice. This class will give students tools from the field of ethnomusicology to engage with the music of the world's people through listening, observing, researching and music-making.
*Choose one course: 1
MUS 133 - Piano Class Intermediate II
This class is designed for students with limited experience in piano. Beginning class is for the student with no piano background or very little prior instruction. Intermediate class is for the student who reads melodic lines and has some previous keyboard experience. Advanced class is for the student who has had a few years of keyboard instruction and wishes to broaden repertoire. Placement in appropriate level is by permission of instructor.(1 credit)
MUS 251 - Piano Lessons
Private instruction is offered in keyboard, voice, brass, woodwind, percussion and string performance. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. (1-2 credits)

Total credits required: 27-28

Note:

*Students with a piano emphasis must substitute 1 credit of class or private lessons in a secondary area.

Philosophy as primary discipline

Philosophy electives 12
PHI 202QR - Logic
(4 credits, alternate years, consult department)(NWCore option under Quantitative Reasoning) An introduction to formal logic. The aim is to enable the student to become skilled in the examination of everyday language for validity, soundness, and cogency, to acquire a basic knowledge of classical sentential logic, and to master proof techniques in propositional logic and the first-order predicate calculus. Prerequisite: C- or better in MAT090, an ACT math score of 20 or above (SAT 510 or above), or a passing score on the MAT090 placement exam.
Choose one course: 4
PHI 200BR - Introduction to Ethics
(4 credits, alternate years, consult department)(IGE option under Belief and Reason) An investigation of some of the main philosophical questions about ethics, such as the following: Does morality depend on religion? Is morality relative to culture? Why should I be moral? How do we go about answering moral questions? Is there a "theory" of morality? If so, what does that theory look like?
PHI 214BR - Contemporary Moral Issues
(4 credits)(NWCore option under Belief and Reason) A philosophical exploration of several contemporary moral issues. Possible topics include abortion, euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide, cloning and stem-cell research, war and terrorism, capital punishment, global poverty, factory farming and experimenting on animals, homosexuality and same-sex marriage, etc.
Choose two courses: 8
PHI 225BR - Ancient Greek Philosophy
(4 credits; non-yearly, consult department)(IGE option under Belief and Reason) An introduction to the ancient Greek philosophical tradition, ranging from the Presocratics to the Hellenists but focusing on Plato and Aristotle.
PHI 226BR - Medieval Philosophy
(4 credits, non-yearly, consult department)(IGE option under Belief and Reason) An introduction to medieval philosophy, focusing on major figures such as Augustine, Boethius, Anselm and Aquinas.
PHI 227BR - Modern Philosophy
(4 credits, alternate years, consult department)(IGE option under Belief and Reason) An introduction to the central figures in the philosophical milieu of the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries, focusing on thinkers such as Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Kant, Mill, Kierkegaard and Nietzsche.
PHI 229 - Twentieth-Century Philosophy
An introduction to some of the dominant philosophers and philosophical movements of the 20th century. (4 credits; non-yearly, consult department)

Total credits required: 28

Note:

Majors are required to take at least 8 credits of 300-level (and above) in elective courses.

Religion as primary discipline

Take any combination of REL courses (excluding REL150 and REL250) to equal 28 credits. Up to eight credits of GRE and HEB may be taken.
REL 260 - Christian Ethics
No course description available.
REL 280 - History of Christianity
No course description available.
REL 290 - Christian Witness and Community Development
No course description available.
REL 294 - Introduction to Christian Missions
No course description available.
REL 295 - Intercultural Communication
No course description available.
REL 310 - Christian Spirituality
No course description available.
REL 317 - Topics in Old Testament Studies
No course description available.
REL 322 - Topics in New Testament Studies
No course description available.
REL 328WI - Biblical Interpretation and Theology
No course description available.
REL 370 - Calvin and Calvinism
No course description available.
REL 375 - Topics in Theology
No course description available.
REL 382 - Religion in America
No course description available.
REL 384 - Topics in the History of Christianity
No course description available.
REL 385 - Topics in Religion
No course description available.
REL 390CC - World Religions
No course description available.
REL 392 - Topics in Missiology
No course description available.
REL 472SR - Bible, Theology and Vocation: Exploring Texts and Contexts
No course description available.
GRE 101 - Elementary Biblical Greek and Culture
This course will focus on learning the basics of koine Greek grammar and vocabulary as well as the cultural backgrounds of the New Testament writings. Readings and translation will focus on the Gospel and Letters of John. The New Testament writings will be examined in light of their social-historical and literary settings within Hellenistic Judaism and the broader Greco-Roman world.(4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
GRE 102LA - Elementary Biblical Greek and Culture
(4 credits, alternate years, consult department)(IGE option under Language and Culture) This course (a continuation of Greek 101) will focus on learning the basics of koine Greek grammar and vocabulary as well as the cultural backgrounds of the New Testament writings. Readings and translation will focus on the Gospel and Letters of John. The New Testament writings will be examined in light of their social-historical and literary settings within Hellenistic Judaism and the broader Greco-Roman world. Prerequisite: GRE101.
GRE 201 - Intermediate Biblical Greek and Culture
This course is designed to facilitate the acquisition and retention of Greek grammatical, exegetical, and interpretive skills through the reading of ancient Greek texts. Primary focus will be on the Gospel of Mark and its context. (1 credit; alternate years, consult department) Prerequisite: GRE102LA.
GRE 202 - Intermediate Biblical Greek and Culture
This course is designed to facilitate the acquisition and retention of Greek grammatical, exegetical, and interpretive skills through the reading of ancient Greek texts. Primary focus will be on the Letters of Paul and selections from other Greco-Roman authors. Students will also be introduced to the sub-discipline of Textual Criticism. (1 credit; alternate years, consult department) Prerequisite: GRE201
HEB 101 - Elementary Biblical Hebrew and Culture
This course will focus on learning the basics of biblical Hebrew (vocabulary and grammar) and the cultural and linguistic backgrounds of the Old Testament. Readings from the different types of literature in the Hebrew Bible will be incorporated into the course work. The Old Testament writings will be studied against the historical and social backgrounds of the ancient Near East.(4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
HEB 102LA - Elementary Biblical Hebrew and Culture
(4 credits; alternate years, consult department)(IGE option under Language and Culture) This course will build on the foundation laid in Hebrew 101 by equipping students to grasp the basics of biblical Hebrew grammar in light of its cultural and linguistic background. Readings from the different types of literature in the Hebrew Bible will be incorporated into the coursework as students develop confidence in speaking Hebrew and interpreting these writings. As a course that satisfies the IGE Language and Culture requirement, students will also explore what it means to read biblical Hebrew with sensitivity toward scholarship, culture, and faith. Prerequisite: HEB101.

Total credits required: 28

Spanish as primary discipline

Literature courses numbered 300 or above 6
Electives: courses numbered 202 or above, taught in Spanish 21

Total credits required: 27

Note:

A maximum of 18 credits may be from approved study-abroad programs, in language, culture, literature or other humanities courses, numbered 202 or above and taught in Spanish.

Theatre and speech as primary discipline

THE 112 - Performance Studies
An introduction to the use of performance as a means of interpreting, analyzing and celebrating literature, and as a tool for experiencing cultural diversity and enacting social change. By providing training in the principles and techniques of performing various genres of literature before an audience, this course seeks to expand students' understanding of the relationships between text and performer, performer and audience, and written and oral forms of literature. Assignments include solo and group performances from poetry, narrative fiction and oral history.(4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
THE 130 - Introduction to Design
An introduction to the concepts of design necessary to approach, create and critically evaluate a theatrical performance environment. Study of the processes of script analysis, design research and communication. Breakdown of aspects and elements that define the most commonly held principles of scenery, costume, lighting and sound design.(2 credits)
THE 215 - Acting
A study of the theoretical framework of the craft of acting.(4 credits)
THE 312 - Directing
Beginning directors review the guiding principles of theatrical art and then apply these to script selection, development of a prompt script, and the complete rehearsal process. Each student prepares a short play for public performance.Prerequisites: THE113 and215 or permission of instructor.(4 credits)
THE 406 - Topics in Dramatic Literature
Specific subject matter of this course will vary from semester to semester, but will focus on the study of dramatic literature from one genre or one playwright or one geographical area or one theme/value.Prerequisite: THE113.(2 credits)
Choose 4 credits: 4
THE 343WI - History and Theory I
(4 credits; alternate years, consult department)(Writing intensive) A study of the development of the history and theory of theatre from its origins through the neoclassical period.
THE 344WI - History and Theory II
(4 credits; alternate years, consult department)(Writing intensive) A study of the development of the history and theory of the theatre from the English Restoration through the postmodern era.
Choose 8 credits: 8
ENG 280 - Shakespeare
William Shakespeare never attended college, yet he saw the world sharply in his mind's eye. He wrote piercingly about kings and college students, warriors and witches, goblins and gravediggers, his 1,000 characters have never been off the stage in 400 years. In this course we read eight plays which fathom the range of human experience and take the English language to the height of expressive beauty. Prerequisite: ENG250LC (4 credits, alternate years)
PHI 238BR - Philosophy of the Arts
(4 credits) (IGE option under Belief and Reason) A study of major theories of the analysis and evaluation of art.
THE 114 - Stagecraft
A practical course which introduces students to the organization, skills and materials necessary for mounting a stage production.(2 credits)
THE 133 - Ballet
A study of the form and techniques of ballet.(1 credit)
THE 135 - Jazz Dance
A study of the form and techniques of jazz dance. Emphasis will be on the integration of modern musical performance.(1 credit)
THE 206 - Playwriting: The One-Act
THE 226 - Scene Design
THE 227 - Introduction to Lighting Design
THE 230 - Costume Design
A study of methods and approaches to costume design for the theatre.Prerequisite: THE130.(2 credits, alternate years, consult department)
THE 260 - Drama Ministries Ensemble
A performance group emphasizing preparation of scripts for presentation in worship services and worship-related settings.(1/2 credit)
THE 305 - Story and Worship
Christian worship, at its core, is remembering the story of God. This includes biblical stories, personal narratives, the Liturgical Year, church history (global and local), and the story journey of each worship service. This course asks why the church must tell its stories and provides specific tools for including stories within worship. This course is not primarily focused on storytelling as drama, but the role of the dramatic arts will not be overlooked. Students will be invited to seriously consider that the ancient Hebrew people had a dramatic anthology, and the class will examine together practical tools for restaging those biblical works for contemporary culture. (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
THE 315 - Acting: Scene Work
Students perform scenes from classical, modern and contemporary literature. Emphasis is placed on script analysis.Prerequisite: THE215.(4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
THE 328 - Advanced Lighting Design
No course description available.
THE 407 - Playwriting: The Full-Length
This continuation of the study of playwriting focuses on the challenges of the long form. The course includes the processes of writing according to classic structural principles, rewriting, formatting and submitting plays for publication.Prerequisite: THE206 or permission of instructor.(4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
THE 465 - Selected Topics in Theatre and Speech
This course will focus on various issues of theatre and speech that are not covered in current course offerings. Possible topics might include: auditioning, stage management, musical theatre, contemporary theatre since 1967, specific genres (comedy, tragedy, theatre of the absurd, Greek, etc.), theatre as social criticism, ethnic theatre, theatre as historical documentary.(2-4 credits, alternate years, consult department)

Total credits required: 28

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