Occupational Therapy

Occupational therapy is based on the use of everyday activities as the means of helping people with physical and/or mental disabilities to achieve independence. To prepare for a career as an occupational therapist, you may choose one of three routes: a bachelor’s degree, a post-baccalaureate certificate program or a master’s degree program. The baccalaureate (bachelor’s) degree program is four years of study: two years (60-semester hours) of pre-professional courses followed by entrance to a professional occupational therapy program in the junior year. The post-baccalaureate certificate program and the master’s degree program are available to individuals who have earned a college degree in a field other than occupational therapy. Both take approximately two years to complete. Employers do not necessarily differentiate between the various entry degrees when hiring new graduates. The following courses are prerequisites to most of the three types of professional programs.

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Recommended courses:

Art elective (any studio course) (4 credits)
BIO 115SN - General Biology: Molecular and Cellular Biology
An introduction to molecular and cellular biology, with an examination of the processes common to living organisms and an introduction to the diversity of life, emphasizing unicellular organisms. This introduction will provide students with a basic understanding of macromolecules, cell structure and function, respiration and photosynthesis, the cell cycle, meiosis, genetics, mechanisms of evolutionary change, and Christian perspectives on evolutionary biology. (4 credits) (NWCore option under Science and the Natural World) Note: Three lectures and 3 hours of laboratory work per week.
MAT 116QR - Statistics for the Natural and Social Sciences
(3 credits)(NWCore option under Quantitative Reasoning) This course is designed to introduce topics in probability and statistics with an emphasis on problems in the sciences. We will study discrete and continuous distributions, estimation and hypothesis testing, p-values, correlation, and simple linear regression. There will be three main sections in this course, examining descriptive statistics (the nature of data and how to summarize it), basic probability concepts (the mathematical study of uncertainty), and inferential statistics (making claims or decisions based on one or more sets of data). Note: Students may receive credit for only one course among MAT 116QR, MAT 117QR and MAT 208. Prerequisites: C- or better in MAT090, an ACT math score of 20 or above (SAT 510 or above), a passing score on the basic algebra placement exam, or permission of instructor.
PHY 111SN - General Physics I
Though all students are welcome in this IGE physics course, this is the first in a two course algebra-based sequence designed particularly for life science majors and others intending to apply to medical or graduate school. The course includes the following topics: kinematics, Newtonian mechanics, energy, momentum, gravity, thermodynamics, and oscillations. Prerequisite: C- or higher in MAT 109QR, ACT math score of 24 or better (SAT 570 or above), or consent of the department chair. (4 credits) (NWCore option under Science and the Natural World) Note: There is a laboratory component to this course.
PSY 100SS - Exploring Psychology
(4 credits)(IGE option under Self and Society) In this course students learn how, using methodologies such as observation, survey and experimentation, psychological science explores the causes and consequences of human action. An overview of major findings from the field of psychology such as biological bases of behavior, learning and memory, motivation and emotion, human development, personality, intelligence, psychopathology and therapy, the effect of others on individuals will be discussed and students will be encouraged to apply this knowledge to their own views and actions. Students will consider why the integration of faith and science in understanding humans is important and will explore ways of accomplishing this integration.
PSY 360 - Psychopathology
(4 credits) This course will provide a broad survey of what is considered to be disordered in behavior, emotional expression, and cognition in adults. Emphasis will be placed on a scientific view of psychopathology. The two main foci of the course are the (a) description of various behaviors, symptoms, syndromes and illnesses as described in the most recent edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) of the American Psychiatric Association, and (b) research and theories concerning etiology including discussion of environmental, biological, social and interactive perspectives. While intervention and childhood disorders will be discussed, they are not the primary focus of this course. Prerequisite: 4 credits of psychology courses.
Choose one course:
CHE 101SN - College Chemistry
(4 credits)(IGE option under Science and the Natural World) This course is an introduction to inorganic chemistry, with an emphasis on the health sciences. It is well suited for students whose programs require one year of chemistry. Note: Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period per week. Open to all students.
CHE 111 - General Chemistry
An introductory course in chemistry that emphasizes physical and inorganic concepts, problems and calculations. Topics include chemical reactions, stoichiometry, properties of gases, thermochemistry, theories of atomic structure, and chemical bonding. The general chemistry sequence (Chemistry 111 and Chemistry 112) is recommended for students with good math / science preparations who intend to proceed to advanced courses in chemistry, the biological sciences or engineering. Prerequisites: high school chemistry and ACT math score of at least 24 (SAT 570 or above). (4 credits)
Choose one sequence:
BIO 121 - Introduction to Human Anatomy
An introduction to the anatomical structures of the human body. The focus of the course will be on structures of: cells, tissues, organs and organ systems. The systems studied will include (but not necessarily limited to) integument, bone, skeletal system (including joints), muscle, cardiovascular, nervous, lymphatic, endocrine, respiratory, renal, reproductive and gastrointestinal.Concurrent requisite: CHE101 or 111.(4 credits)
BIO 122 - Introduction to Human Physiology
An introduction to the physiology of the human body. The focus of the course will be on homeostasis and the function of: biomolecules, cells and tissues, organs and organ systems. The contribution of each of the following organ systems to physiologic homeostasis will be examined: nervous, muscle, cardiovascular, endocrine, respiratory, renal, reproductive and gastrointestinal. Prerequisite: CHE101 or 111; Concurrent requisite: CHE102 or 112. (4 credits)
or
BIO 221 - Human Anatomy
A study of the gross structure of the systems of the human body.Prerequisite: BIO102, 115 or permission of instructor.(4 credits)
BIO 222 - Human Physiology
A study of the mechanisms by which the human body functions. Emphasis will be given to nerve and muscle function, and thereafter to hormonal control and the integrated systems that allow for respiratory, digestive, excretory and reproductive activities.Prerequisites: BIO102 or 115 and CHE101, 102 or CHE111, 112 or permission of instructor.(4 credits)
Choose one course:
ENG 288 - Writing in the Professions
A study of professional writing. In a writing workshop setting, students will learn to adjust style, tone and content to accomplish a definite purpose with an identified audience. They will also learn strategies for creating texts that are clear, concise and accurate. The course is especially useful for those whose career goals require facility in written communication, such as those studying marketing, public relations, advertising, management or law. All students will choose a professional to be their mentor on a writing project related to the career they are interested in. Students will also build a small portfolio of professional writing that includes letters, a memo, a resume and a research report. Prerequisites: sophomore class standing or ACT English score of 30 or above (SAT 680 or higher). (2 credits)
ENG 290WI - The Art of the Essay
(2 credits)(Writing intensive) A study of some of the best contemporary American non-fiction writing on such subjects as politics, the arts, religion, natural science and medicine. Students write on similar topics and develop their own style by emulating such models. Prerequisites: sophomore class standing or permission of instructor.
ENG 297 - The Rhetoric of Persuasion
A study of the methods of persuasion: logical and emotional appeals and trustworthiness, ways of structuring arguments, and persuasive style. Students will learn to create and critique arguments on a variety of subjects. Prerequisites: sophomore class standing or permission of instructor. (4 credits; alternate years, consult department)
Choose four credits:
PSY 221SS - Developmental Psychology: Childhood
(4 credits)(IGE option under Self and Society) This course explores the development of the child from the prenatal period into adolescence. Children's physical, cognitive, emotional, personality, social, moral and faith development is examined. Psychological research methods for studying children are covered.
PSY 224 - Developmental Psychology: Adolescence
Adolescents experience many changes in a few short years as they transition from childhood to adulthood. This course explores the major psychological issues and theories in adolescent development with emphasis on cognitive development, self-concept, peer relationships and sexuality, among others.(4 credits)
PSY 225 - Developmental Psychology: Adulthood
This course explores psychological issues and theories in normal adult development, with emphasis on cognitive, social and personality functioning from young adulthood to old age.(4 credits)

Total credits recommended: 41-43

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