Athletic Training

The athletic training major is designed to prepare you to pass the Board of Certification (BOC) for the Athletic Trainer (AT). Admission into the athletic training program will be on a competitive basis. Applications will be accepted twice per year, due October 1 and February 1. Students will have until the February deadline of their sophomore year to make an official application to the program. The acceptance procedures for a transfer student will depend on the institution from which the student is transferring (i.e., accredited or non-accredited programs). There is no guarantee that students joining the program late in their career will be qualified to graduate in four years. Each applicant must submit a formal application to the program. If the student meets all necessary criteria, he/she will be asked to have an interview with the athletic training program director and the current athletic training staff. Students intending to pursue a career in athletic training will be given preference for admittance into Northwestern's AT program. Our athletic training majors receive hands-on experience beginning their sophomore year, have a very strong BOC pass rate and are accepted into outstanding graduate programs.

Athletic training homepage

Major requirements

KIN 152 - Emergency Care
An intensive course in basic life support including lectures, demonstrations, and practice in accident prevention and treatment of injuries and illnesses. BLS for the Healthcare Provider and Heartsaver First Aid certification will be secured upon successful completion of this course. This course is required for athletic training majors. Prerequisiteor concurrent: KIN180. (2 credits)
KIN 180 - Introduction to Kinesiology
Introduction to the field of kinesiology including aims, objectives, history, philosophy, programs, principles, basic concepts of organization and administration, professional organizations, and the relationship of Christian commitment to the field.(3 credits)
KIN 233 - Anatomical Kinesiology
The study of human movement based on anatomical and mechanical principles. Emphasis is placed on the application of these principles in the analysis of human sports performance. Prerequisite: BIO102, 115, 121 or permission of the instructor. (3 credits)
KIN 234 - Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries
(3 credits) An introduction to athletic injury prevention, recognition,evaluation, care and rehabilitation: including basic wrapping and tapingtechniques. Adult first aid certification will be secured upon successfulcompletion of the course.Note: Includes one lab period per week.Prerequisite: BIO 102, 115, 121 or permission of instructor.
KIN 243 - Recognition and Evaluation of Athletic Injuries I
This course aims to give students the necessary information and practice to perform injury evaluations. This course will stress the importance of recognizing the mechanisms of injury, knowing the related anatomical structures, and performing the appropriate special tests to determine assessment of injury. Students will also be instructed on evaluation procedures such as HOPS and SOAP. Prerequisite: KIN234. (3 credits)
KIN 244 - Recognition and Evaluation of Athletic Injuries II
This course aims to give students the necessary information and practice to perform injury evaluations. This course will stress the importance of recognizing the mechanisms of injury, knowing the related anatomical structures, and performing the appropriate special tests to determine assessment of injury. Students will also be instructed evaluation procedures such as HOPS and SOAP. Successful completion of KIN234, KIN243 and either BIO102, BIO115 or BIO121. (3 credits)
KIN 251 - Practicum in Athletic Training I
Provides practical experience with skills related to the prevention and care of athletic/physically active individual's injuries. This course will provide competency and proficiency assessment of student's knowledge and skills gained to ensure learning over time.Prerequisites: KIN151 and 152, and acceptance into the athletic training education program.(1 credit)
KIN 252 - Practicum in Athletic Training II
Provides practical experience with skills related to recognition and evaluation of athletic/physically active individual's injuries in the upper extremity and cervical/thoracic spine regions. This course will provide competency and proficiency assessment of student's knowledge and skills gained to ensure learning over time.Prerequisites: KIN151, 152 and 251, and acceptance into the athletic training education program.(1 credit)
KIN 325WI - Physiology of Exercise
(4 credits)(Writing intensive) The study of the physiological effect of exercise on the human body. Emphasis will be given to metabolism, neuromuscular physiology, cardiopulmonary physiology, and the integration of all physiology systems.Note: Course includes one 90-minute laboratory period per week.Prerequisites: BIO121 and 122 or BIO221 and 222, CHE101 and 102 or CHE111 and 112, or permission of instructor.
KIN 330 - Exercise Testing and Prescription
Provides knowledge and practical experience in physical fitness assessments, interpretation of assessment results, and exercise prescription. Emphasis is placed on assessments within a clinical or research setting.Prerequisite: KIN325 or permission of instructor.(3 credits, alternate years, consult department)
KIN 342 - Therapeutic Interventions
KIN 349 - Organization and Administration of Athletic Training
This course will build on knowledge learned in prerequisite courses. Course content will concentrate on administrative duties in athletic training, history of the NATA, and current topics in sports medicine.Prerequisites: KIN234, 243 and advancement to level 3 or 4 of the athletic training program.(2 credits, alternate years, consult department)
KIN 351 - Practicum in Athletic Training III
Provides practical experience with skills related to recognition and evaluation of athletic/physically active individual's injuries in the lower extremity and thoracic/lumbar spine regions. This course will provide competency and proficiency assessment of student's knowledge and skills gained to ensure learning over time.Prerequisites: KIN251, 252 and acceptance into the athletic training education program.(1 credit)
KIN 352 - Practicum in Athletic Training IV
Provides practical experience in developing knowledge of other health care professionals and other important issues regarding the overall health and well-being of athletes/physically active individuals. This course will provide competency and proficiency assessment of student's knowledge and skills gained to ensure learning over time.Prerequisites: KIN251, 252, 351 and acceptance into the athletic training education program.(1 credit)
KIN 355 - Psychosocial Aspects of Sport for Health Care Professions
This course will introduce those entering into a health care profession how to cope with various psychosocial aspects of injury, psychology of injury, and counseling techniques. Students will also learn various mechanisms to cope with psychosocial issues among those they are caring for as well as themselves.Prerequisites: KIN234, 243, PSY111 or permission of instructor.(2 credits, alternate years, consult department)
KIN 451 - Practicum in Athletic Training V
Provides practical experience with skills related to modalities and the psychosocial aspects of the athlete/physically active individual. This course will provide competency and proficiency assessment of student's knowledge and skills gained to ensure learning over time.Prerequisites: KIN351, 352 and acceptance into the athletic training education program.(1 credit)
KIN 452 - Practicum in Athletic Training VI
Provides practical experience with skills related to rehabilitation and the organization and administration in athletic training. This course will provide competency and proficiency assessment of student's knowledge and skills gained to ensure learning over time.Prerequisites: KIN351, 352, 451 and acceptance into the athletic training education program.(1 credit)
Choose one course:
KIN 370 - Nutrition for Health Care Professions
The study of the fundamental principles of normal nutrition and the importance of nutrition in promoting growth and health. Emphasis will be given to the basic food constituents and their physiological relationships within the body. Consideration will also be given to family and community needs across the lifespan.Prerequisites: CHE101/102 or CHE111/112, BIO121/122 or BIO221/222.(3 credits)
KIN 371 - Sports Nutrition
No course description available.

Competency requirements:

Pass physical fitness competency examination

Cognate requirements:

BIO 320 - Pharmacology
A survey of the pharmacologic basis of therapeutics beginning with an introduction to the principles of pharmacology. This is followed by a survey of the more important drugs used in medicine with emphasis on mechanism of action, clinical use, and adverse effects. Prerequisites: BIO222 and CHE101, 102 or CHE111, 112. (4 credits)
CHE 101 - College Chemistry
An introductory course in inorganic chemistry. The treatment of topics is predominantly descriptive and the content is especially suited to meet the needs of students whose programs require only one year of chemistry.(4 credits)
CHE 102 - College Chemistry
An introductory course in organic and biological chemistry. The content is especially suited to meet the needs of students whose programs require only one year of chemistry.Prerequisite: CHE101.(4 credits)
PSY 100SS - Exploring Psychology
(4 credits)(IGE option under Self and Society) In this course students learnhow, using methodologies such asobservation, survey and experimentation, psychological science exploresthe causes and consequences of human action. An overview of majorfindings from the field of psychology such as biological bases ofbehavior, learning and memory, motivation and emotion, human development,personality, intelligence, psychopathology and therapy, the effect ofothers on individuals will be discussed and students will be encouragedto apply this knowledge to their own views and actions. Students willconsider why the integration of faith and science in understanding humansis important and will explore ways of accomplishing this integration.
Choose one option:
Option 1:
BIO 121 - Introduction to Human Anatomy
An introduction to the anatomical structures of the human body. The focus of the course will be on structures of: cells, tissues, organs and organ systems. The systems studied will include (but not necessarily limited to) integument, bone, skeletal system (including joints), muscle, cardiovascular, nervous, lymphatic, endocrine, respiratory, renal, reproductive and gastrointestinal.Concurrent requisite: CHE101 or 111.(4 credits)
BIO 122 - Introduction to Human Physiology
An introduction to the physiology of the human body. The focus of the course will be on homeostasis and the function of: biomolecules, cells and tissues, organs and organ systems. The contribution of each of the following organ systems to physiologic homeostasis will be examined: nervous, muscle, cardiovascular, endocrine, respiratory, renal, reproductive and gastrointestinal. Prerequisite: CHE101 or 111; Concurrent requisite: CHE102 or 112. (4 credits)
Option 2:
BIO 221 - Human Anatomy
A study of the gross structure of the systems of the human body.Prerequisite: BIO102, 115 or permission of instructor.(4 credits)
BIO 222 - Human Physiology
A study of the mechanisms by which the human body functions. Emphasis will be given to nerve and muscle function, and thereafter to hormonal control and the integrated systems that allow for respiratory, digestive, excretory and reproductive activities.Prerequisites: BIO102 or 115 and CHE101, 102 or CHE111, 112 or permission of instructor.(4 credits)

Total credits required: 66

Note:

The following courses are recommended:

KIN 333 - Biomechanics
Mechanical principles and concepts governing human movement are examined, with an emphasis on analyzing sport skills. Prerequisite: KIN233. (3 credits; alternate years, consult department)
KIN 403 - Motor Learning
Understanding of theoretical constructs of learning and knowledge of motor learning principles relating to response mechanisms, feedback, motivation, stress anxiety factors, and the influence of psycho-social elements in the acquisition of complex movements. (3 credits)
PSY 360 - Psychopathology
(4 credits) This course will provide a broad survey of what is considered to be disordered in behavior, emotional expression, and cognition in adults. Emphasis will be placed on a scientific view of psychopathology. The two main foci of the course are the (a) description of various behaviors, symptoms, syndromes and illnesses as described in the most recent edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) of the American Psychiatric Association, and (b) research and theories concerning etiology including discussion of environmental, biological, social and interactive perspectives. While intervention and childhood disorders will be discussed, they are not the primary focus of this course. Prerequisite: 4 credits of psychology courses.

Graduates of Northwestern's Athletic Training program are also candidates for physical therapy graduate programs. Athletic trainers cannot become physical therapists without completing physical therapy professional training, nor can physical therapists become athletic trainers unless they have graduated from an accredited athletic training program and passed the Board of Certification examination. Some universities offer a program that combines an entry-level graduate athletic training program and a graduate physical therapy program for students whose undergraduate degree could be in exercise science, biology or a related field.

Athletic Training Program Director: Jennifer Rogers, MS, LAT, ATC, PhD

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