Neuroscience and Persons (NAPS)

The career concentration in neuroscience and persons is designed to introduce you to the fascinating study of the nervous system and its relationship to our personhood. The 21st century has been referred to as the "Century of the Brain," a time during which tremendous effort and career opportunities will occur as we try to understand the nervous system and treat its numerous health-related disorders. The NAPs program prepares you for graduate school, medical school or other professional training in neuroscience or its many contributing and cognate areas such as biology, psychology and health-related fields generally. This interdisciplinary program will prepare you for careers in basic and applied research and teaching (e.g., in pharmaceutical, biotechnology and academic settings), as well as careers in traditional health-care fields (e.g., medicine, nursing, psychology, counseling and all areas of mental health). There are two options: the standard program provides a basic background for fields related to neuroscience and persons generally, whereas the neuroscience concentration provides a more intensive science background preparing you for entrance to graduate or post-graduate professional programs in neuroscience and medically related fields.

Neuroscience and persons: standard program

Required courses:
Completion of a biology, chemistry, computer science, philosophy or psychology major (other majors with approval)

BIO 345 - Neuroscience and Persons Seminar (NAPs)
Interdisciplinary lectures, discussions and presentations related to the reading and critiquing of literature on selected topics in the area of neuroscience and persons. Student-led discussions and presentations (oral and written) will be emphasized. Possible topics include: artificial/machine intelligence, clinical neuroscience and neuropathology, cognitive neuroscience, neuroscience and Christianity, neuroscience of emotion, neuroethics, neuromodeling, neuroscience of mental illness, neurophilosophy, neurotheology and social neuroscience; consideration of NAPs-related student research may also be included. Prerequisite: BIO340 or permission of instructor. (2 credits; alternate years, consult department)
PHI 204BR - Mind, Knowledge and Reality
(4 credits)(IGE option under Belief and Reason) An introduction to the mainmetaphysical and epistemological theories ofphilosophy. Issues addressed include the existence of God, the problem ofevil, the mind-body problem, knowledge and skepticism, and personalidentity and resurrection.
PSY 100SS - Exploring Psychology
(4 credits)(IGE option under Self and Society) In this course students learnhow, using methodologies such asobservation, survey and experimentation, psychological science exploresthe causes and consequences of human action. An overview of majorfindings from the field of psychology such as biological bases ofbehavior, learning and memory, motivation and emotion, human development,personality, intelligence, psychopathology and therapy, the effect ofothers on individuals will be discussed and students will be encouragedto apply this knowledge to their own views and actions. Students willconsider why the integration of faith and science in understanding humansis important and will explore ways of accomplishing this integration.
PSY 315 - Learning and Cognition
An introduction to the topics of learning, memory and cognition within the field of experimental psychology. An emphasis will be placed on approaching problems as an "experimental psychologist." Advantages and limitations of the experimental approach and applications of the knowledge base of experimental psychology will be highlighted.Prerequisites: PSY111 and 215.(4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
PSY 360 - Psychopathology
(4 credits) This course will provide a broad survey of what is considered to be disordered in behavior, emotional expression, and cognition in adults. Emphasis will be placed on a scientific view of psychopathology. The two main foci of the course are the (a) description of various behaviors, symptoms, syndromes and illnesses as described in the most recent edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) of the American Psychiatric Association, and (b) research and theories concerning etiology including discussion of environmental, biological, social and interactive perspectives. While intervention and childhood disorders will be discussed, they are not the primary focus of this course. Prerequisite: 4 credits of psychology courses.
Choose one course
BIO 150SN - Brain and Behavior: The Mind’s Machine
An interdisciplinary introduction to the biological, psychological, andneuroscientific foundations of the brain, mind and behavior that integratesChristian perspectives to address questions like "who amd I" and "how andwhy do I do what I do." (4 credits) (NWCore option under Science and theNatural World)Note: Includes 3 lectures and 1 1/2 hours of lab per week. Does not counttoward a biology major or minor.
BIO 340 - Neuroscience
Introduction to the structure and function of the nervous system, emphasizing neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, neuropharmacology and aspects of neuropathology. Multiple levels will be explored from the molecular and cellular levels through brain and spinal cord networks that contribute to complex behavioral and cognitive function. Prerequisites: BIO102SN or 221 or permission of instructor. (4 credits; alternate years, consult department)Note: Includes 3 hours of lecture and additional laboratory work each week.
Choose one option: 4-8 credits
Option 1:
BIO 102SN - Introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology
An introduction to the structure and function of the human body. (4 credits)(NWCore option under Science and the Natural World)Note: Includes 1 1/2 hours of lab per week. Does not count toward a biology major or minor. A fee is associated with this course.
Option 2*:
BIO 221 - Human Anatomy
A study of the gross structure of the systems of the human body. Prerequisite: BIO102SN, 115 or permission of instructor. (4 credits)Note: Includes 3 hours of lab per week.
BIO 222 - Human Physiology
A study of the mechanisms by which the human body functions. Emphasis will be given to nerve and muscle function, and thereafter to hormonal control and the integrated systems that allow for respiratory, digestive, excretory and reproductive activities. Prerequisites: BIO102SN or 115 and CHE101SN, 102 or CHE111, 112 or permission of instructor. (4 credits)Note: Includes 3 hours of lab per week.
Capstone research experience - choose one: 0-4 credits
Approved off-campus summer undergraduate research experience
PSY 398 - Directed Study or BIO, CHE, CSC, PHI 398
PSY 406 - Psychology Research Lab (psychology majors)
As a culminating experience, senior students conduct a semester-long empirical research project and produce an APA-formatted report. This is substantive project that allows the student to individually explore a self-selected research topic in depth and to experience the research process from initial idea to finished publication-ready manuscript. It challenges the student to think creatively, to integrate knowledge and skills obtained throughout the psychology curriculum, and to produce a worthwhile contribution to the field.Prerequisites: 20 credits of psychology courses including PSY215 and 216.(4 credits)
PSY 499 - Honors Research or BIO, CHE, CSC, PHI 499

Total credits required beyond major: 26-34

Notes:

*Recommended option

Neuroscience and persons: neuroscience concentration

Required courses:
Completion of a biology, chemistry, computer science, philosophy or psychology major (other majors with approval)
BIO 340 - Neuroscience
Introduction to the structure and function of the nervous system, emphasizing neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, neuropharmacology and aspects of neuropathology. Multiple levels will be explored from the molecular and cellular levels through brain and spinal cord networks that contribute to complex behavioral and cognitive function. Prerequisites: BIO102SN or 221 or permission of instructor. (4 credits; alternate years, consult department)Note: Includes 3 hours of lecture and additional laboratory work each week.
BIO 345 - Neuroscience and Persons Seminar (NAPs)
Interdisciplinary lectures, discussions and presentations related to the reading and critiquing of literature on selected topics in the area of neuroscience and persons. Student-led discussions and presentations (oral and written) will be emphasized. Possible topics include: artificial/machine intelligence, clinical neuroscience and neuropathology, cognitive neuroscience, neuroscience and Christianity, neuroscience of emotion, neuroethics, neuromodeling, neuroscience of mental illness, neurophilosophy, neurotheology and social neuroscience; consideration of NAPs-related student research may also be included. Prerequisite: BIO340 or permission of instructor. (2 credits; alternate years, consult department)
CHE 321 - Organic Chemistry
The study of carbon compounds and their functional groups, including nomenclature, synthesis, reactions, structures, mechanisms and spectroscopic analysis. Prerequisites: CHE102 or 112 or permission of instructor. (4 credits)Note: Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period per week.
CHE 322 - Organic Chemistry
A continuation of the study of carbon compounds and their functional groups, including nomenclature, synthesis, reactions, structures, mechanisms and spectroscopic analysis. Prerequisite: CHE321. (4 credits)Note: Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period per week.
PHI 204BR - Mind, Knowledge and Reality
(4 credits)(IGE option under Belief and Reason) An introduction to the mainmetaphysical and epistemological theories ofphilosophy. Issues addressed include the existence of God, the problem ofevil, the mind-body problem, knowledge and skepticism, and personalidentity and resurrection.
PSY 100SS - Exploring Psychology
(4 credits)(IGE option under Self and Society) In this course students learnhow, using methodologies such asobservation, survey and experimentation, psychological science exploresthe causes and consequences of human action. An overview of majorfindings from the field of psychology such as biological bases ofbehavior, learning and memory, motivation and emotion, human development,personality, intelligence, psychopathology and therapy, the effect ofothers on individuals will be discussed and students will be encouragedto apply this knowledge to their own views and actions. Students willconsider why the integration of faith and science in understanding humansis important and will explore ways of accomplishing this integration.
Choose one option: 4-8 credits
Option 1:
BIO 102SN - Introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology
An introduction to the structure and function of the human body. (4 credits)(NWCore option under Science and the Natural World)Note: Includes 1 1/2 hours of lab per week. Does not count toward a biology major or minor. A fee is associated with this course.
Option 2*:
BIO 221 - Human Anatomy
A study of the gross structure of the systems of the human body. Prerequisite: BIO102SN, 115 or permission of instructor. (4 credits)Note: Includes 3 hours of lab per week.
BIO 222 - Human Physiology
A study of the mechanisms by which the human body functions. Emphasis will be given to nerve and muscle function, and thereafter to hormonal control and the integrated systems that allow for respiratory, digestive, excretory and reproductive activities. Prerequisites: BIO102SN or 115 and CHE101SN, 102 or CHE111, 112 or permission of instructor. (4 credits)Note: Includes 3 hours of lab per week.
Choose two courses: 8 credits
BIO 202WI - Genetics and Genomics
An introduction to the principles of heredity and their practical application.Prerequisites: BIO115 or 116 (4 credits) (Writing Intensive)Note: Includes 1 1/2 hours of lab per week.
BIO 307 - Histology
A study of the microscopic structure of cells, tissues and organs in vertebrate animals with special emphasis on human tissues. An effort is made to correlate structure and function and highlight important pathologies. Prerequisites: BIO115 and 116. (4 credits; alternate years, consult department)Note: Includes 3 hours of lab per week.
BIO 310WI - Cell Biology
A study of the structure and function of cells and of their subcellularorganelles. Structural detail will be described to the level ofmacromolecular assemblages. Wherever possible, function will be described interms of the molecular mechanisms that underlie biological processes.Prerequisites: BIO115, 116, and CHE101SN, 102, or CHE11, 112. (4 credits, alternate years)Note: Includes three lectures and 1 1/2 hours of lab per week.
BIO 320 - Pharmacology
A survey of the pharmacologic basis of therapeutics beginning with an introduction to the principles of pharmacology. This is followed by a survey of the more important drugs used in medicine with emphasis on mechanism of action, clinical use, and adverse effects. Prerequisites: BIO122 or BIO222 and CHE101, 102 or CHE111, 112. (4 credits)
BIO 326x - Biochemistry:Proteins and Metabolism
A fundamental course surveying biomolecules, catabolism, bioenergetics and biosynthesis. Prerequisites: CHE321 and 322. (4 credits)Note: Includes 3 hours of lab per week.
BIO 327 - Biochemistry:Molecular Genetics
No course description available.
Choose one sequence: 8 credits
CHE 101 - College Chemistry
An introductory course in inorganic chemistry. The treatment of topics is predominantly descriptive and the content is especially suited to meet the needs of students whose programs require only one year of chemistry.(4 credits)
CHE 102 - College Chemistry
An introductory course in organic and biological chemistry. The content is especially suited to meet the needs of students whose programs require only one year of chemistry. Prerequisite: CHE101. (4 credits)Note: Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week.
CHE 111 - General Chemistry*
An introductory course in chemistry that emphasizes physical and inorganic concepts, problems and calculations. Topics include chemical reactions, stoichiometry, properties of gases, thermochemistry, theories of atomic structure, and chemical bonding. The general chemistry sequence (Chemistry 111 and Chemistry 112) is recommended for students with good math / science preparations who intend to proceed to advanced courses in chemistry, the biological sciences or engineering. Prerequisites: high school chemistry and ACT math score of at least 24 (SAT550 or above). (4 credits)Note: Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week.
CHE 112 - General Chemistry
A continuation of Chemistry 111. Topics covered include kinetics, thermodynamics, chemical equilibria, acid-base chemistry and nuclear chemistry. Prerequisite: CHE111 or consent of the instructor. (4 credits)Note: Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period per week.
Choose one course**: 3 credits
MAT 111QR - Calculus for Management, Life and Social Sciences
This course is a study of functions, limits, derivatives and integrals with an emphasis on techniques and applications in business, biology, health, and social sciences.Note: Does not count toward a math major or minor.Prerequisites: C- or higher in MAT109QR, or an ACT math score of at least 22 (SAT 520 or above), or permission of mathematics department chair.(3 credits) (NWCore option under Quantitative Reasoning)
MAT 116QR - Statistics for the Natural and Social Sciences
This course is designed to introduce topics in probability and statistics with an emphasis on problems in the sciences. We will study discrete and continuous distributions, estimation and hypothesis testing, p-values, correlation, and simple linear regression. There will be three main sections in this course, examining descriptive statistics (the nature of data and how to summarize it), basic probability concepts (the mathematical study of uncertainty), and inferential statistics (making claims or decisions based on one or more sets of data). Note: Students may receive credit for only one course among MAT116QR, MAT117QR andMAT208QR.Prerequisites: C- or better in MAT090, an ACT math score of 20 or above (SAT 480 or above), a passing score on the basic algebra placement exam, or permission of instructor.(3 credits)(NWCore option under Quantitative Reasoning)
Choose one course**: 4 credits
PSY 315 - Learning and Cognition
An introduction to the topics of learning, memory and cognition within the field of experimental psychology. An emphasis will be placed on approaching problems as an "experimental psychologist." Advantages and limitations of the experimental approach and applications of the knowledge base of experimental psychology will be highlighted.Prerequisites: PSY111 and 215.(4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
PSY 360 - Psychopathology
(4 credits) This course will provide a broad survey of what is considered to be disordered in behavior, emotional expression, and cognition in adults. Emphasis will be placed on a scientific view of psychopathology. The two main foci of the course are the (a) description of various behaviors, symptoms, syndromes and illnesses as described in the most recent edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) of the American Psychiatric Association, and (b) research and theories concerning etiology including discussion of environmental, biological, social and interactive perspectives. While intervention and childhood disorders will be discussed, they are not the primary focus of this course. Prerequisite: 4 credits of psychology courses.
Capstone research experience - choose one: 0-4 credits
Approved off-campus summer undergraduate research experience
PSY 398 - Directed Study or BIO, CHE, CSC, PHI 398
PSY 406 - Psychology Research Lab (psychology majors)
As a culminating experience, senior students conduct a semester-long empirical research project and produce an APA-formatted report. This is substantive project that allows the student to individually explore a self-selected research topic in depth and to experience the research process from initial idea to finished publication-ready manuscript. It challenges the student to think creatively, to integrate knowledge and skills obtained throughout the psychology curriculum, and to produce a worthwhile contribution to the field.Prerequisites: 20 credits of psychology courses including PSY215 and 216.(4 credits)
PSY 499 - Honors Research or BIO, CHE, CSC, PHI 499

Total credits required beyond major: 49-57

Notes:

*Recommended option **Both courses recommended

Recommended courses
Special topics courses in religion and sociology
PHI 342 - Philosophy of Natural Science
This course will help one understand the natural sciences by examining a number of issues as they arise in the history of science. Issues discussed include: e.g., a) what distinguishes science from non-science? b) how are scientific theories justified? c) what is the role of values in scientific inquiry? d) what is required in ascientific explanation? e) do science and religion conflict? f) what is involved in a comprehensive scientific worldview? Representative thinkers include, e.g., Isaac Newton, Pierre Duhem, Ernst Mach, Karl Popper, Thomas Kuhn.Prerequisite: at least one philosophy course. PHI202 is helpful, but not required.(4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
PHY 213 - Electronics and Instrumentation
For students seeking a minor in physics. Topics will include analog and digital electronics components, basic analog and digital theory of circuit operation, and interfacing recording instruments to experimental apparatus.Prerequisite: PHY212 or permission of department chair.(3 credits, alternate years, consult department)
PSY 215 - Research Design and Introductory Statistics
This course acquaints the student with basic empirical research techniques in the behavioral sciences including political science, psychology, social work and sociology. The course aims to enable the student to function as a conductor and a consumer of behavioral science research. Techniques include: observation, questionnaire and survey, interview, single-subject designs, qualitative research, and experimental and quasi-experimental methodologies. Topics include: descriptive and basic inferential statistics, sampling methods and research ethics. Prerequisites: PSY111, SOC101, PSC101, or PSC105, and fulfillment of the general education math requirement. (4 credits)
PSY 216WI - Research Design and Advanced Statistics
Skills in statistical analysis and interpretation of psychological researchare developed in this course with emphasis on correlation, regression andanalysis of variance. Basic skills learned in Research Methods I areextended through practice in conducting, analyzing and reporting researchusing statistical software such as SPSS. Prerequisite: PSY215. (4 credits)
PSY 418 - Christ and Psychology
No course description available.
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