Schedule

  • 12:00 PM

    • No workshops were found matching your selected topic
    • A River Runs Through It Fynaardt, Keith | Old Factory (Old Factory) | 2.5 Hours Norman Maclean wrote, "My father was very sure about certain matters pertaining to the universe. To him all good things—trout as well as eternal salvation—come by grace and grace comes by art and art does not come easy." In his semi-autobiographical novella, "A River Runs Through It", Norman Maclean writes about family and fly-fishing, tragedy and redemption. He writes about faith, courage and art. Dr. Keith Fynaardt, English, will screen the academy-award-winning film adaptation of "A River Runs Through It", directed by Robert Redford and starring Brad Pitt, and host a post-film discussion.
    • The Art of Walking Caffney & Stokes | Other (Puddle Jumper) | 2 Hours Together we will walk from Northwestern College to the Catholic Church in Alton as we discuss and experience walking, art and landscape. Can movement, besides dance and theater, be considered art? How does walking a landscape differ from driving? Is a collective walk of faith or protest an artistic expression? We will explore these questions and others during this walk. Please refrain from cell phone use during this walk. Brittany Caffey is in her fifth year as a resident director at Northwestern. The summer before she began her first year, she walked 500 miles across Spain on a pilgrimage called El Camino de Santiago (The Way of Saint James). This influences her view of journeying through life and walking as art. Emily Stokes is in her fourth year as a member of the art department at Northwestern. Her upper-level art history course (briefly) covers the work of Hamish Fulton and Robert Long, two contemporary artists interested in the idea of walking as art.
  • 1:00 PM

    • No workshops were found matching your selected topic
    • Art Is Worship Van Gelder, Phyllis | Learning Commons (Vogel A) | 1 Hour Phyllis Van Gelder is a fifth grade teacher at Orange City Christian School who also has a passionate interest in and appreciation of the arts. In her “spare time” she enjoys her volunteer position as president of the Orange City Arts Council. The Arts Council works alongside the director, Janine Calsbeek, to enrich Orange City with diverse, high quality art programming. This past fall Phyllis had the opportunity to attend "ArtPrize 2014" in Grand Rapids, Michigan and found this unique event to be a fascinating cultural experience. Her presentation will allow for discussion and interpretation of the art itself as well as dialogue about how we worship through artistic expression.
    • Arvo Pärt: a double dose of courage Holm, Thomas | Music Building (DMH 115 (Choir Room)) | 30 Minutes Named “World’s most performed living composer” for three years running (Bachtrack, 2014), and with his music appearing in over sixty films/movies, you might expect Estonian composer Arvo Paert to have led a rather privileged life. Clashes with Soviet authorities over his experimentation with music from the “west” led to his immigration to a new homeland in Germany. His own compositional dead-end led to a completely new style that was rooted neither in the experimentation of the ‘60’s nor in traditional tonal music. In this presentation and performance, we will discover a man of deep faith and artistic integrity that faced his obstacles with courage and determination. We will look at traits of his style that are non-traditional and are seemingly irresistible to film composers. We will end with a performance for violin and piano of one of his beloved works in this new style, a work that appears in films such as "Heaven," "Dear Frankie," "Swept Away," and "Since Otar Left."Presenters: Thomas Holm. Musicians: Bethany Dykstra (violin), Andrew Currier (piano)
    • Breaking the Silence Professor Valerie Stokes and the students of SWK 230 | Theatre Building (Black Box) | to 5:00 PM By using the stories of those who have been impacted by interpersonal violence, Breaking Silence is able to present their stories in an individual and powerful way. Each participant is provided with an audio player and is invited to listen to the story of a survivor while walking through the setting that brings certain aspects of their experience to life. By recreating the familiar worlds of a dorm room, a kitchen, or a family room the imagery that is painted in one’s mind allows for the establishment of active empathy that empowers participants to end our current culture of abuse. Presenters: Dr. Valerie Stokes, Joslynn Roth, Rebecca Quade, Kelcie Scarlett, Jenna Beeson, Paige Rensink, Anthony Wubben, Kelsey VanDeBerg, McKenna Halter, Haley Ginger, Pedro Ruiz, Cayla Slattery
    • Colors of Snow Simms, Mavis | Art Building (TGK 103) | 20 Minutes (Repeated at 2 and 3 p.m.) Mavis Simms was born in Northern Minnesota and grew up working with textiles for utilitarian purposes. In 2010 she began experimenting with several processes of hand dying fabric. More recently she started “Snow dyeing” and has been thrilled with the unpredictable, yet eye-catching results. Her work is predominantly natural fibers but she also enjoys repurposing vintage pieces.  Some of these are embellished with beading.  She is always amazed to see the combination of colors in the fabric as a result of this process and no two pieces are ever the same.  Her focus is using this dyed fabric to create one of a kind wall art in several diverse ways and is continues to be inspired by other artists and every day things around her. 
    • Glass Devised Theatre Team | Ramaker Center (Fireside Room) | 40 Minutes The Northwestern College Theatre Department presents a play written and produced by students. This devised theatre piece was performed at the Kennedy Center American College Theatre Festival in January. It tells the true story of James Tughan, an artist of faith whose son died last November. Northwestern had the opportunity to host Tughan in chapel last fall and to display his work in our gallery. Come hear his story is of family, loss, courage, and great faith. Ensemble: Rowan Sullivan, Benjamin Bosch, Logan Wright, Abby Bliss, Abi Stoscher, Carolyn Hopkins, Abby McCubbin, Elizabeth Meier, Warren Duncan, Kyle TenHulzen
    • The Human Becoming Theory: The Was, Is, and Will Be… in Mental Health Professor Diane Smith and the students of NURS 380 | Ramaker Center (RMK 202) | 30 Minutes In light of the theme, "The Art of Courage" we have explored the effectiveness of art as therapy for the mind. Based on recent research (Heenan, 2007), it has been discovered that music and art therapy are beneficial for positive mental health. Come join us as we demonstrate this through finger painting and listening to different music genres. It takes courage to finger paint your feelings. Presenters: Kelsey Brower, Emily Culver, Alissa Gilbaugh, Sarah Rathbun, Monica Rustad, Jerrica Walling
    • Wilderness Spaces, Artful Thinking Coldwater Foundation | Art Building (TGK 108) | 60 Minutes Powerful art often emerges in the crucible of challenging circumstances. The wilderness is often accommodating and as a result it is a catalyst for strong reflective thinking and consequently, reflective art. Join us as we share art that has been shaped by wilderness experiences in wilderness places and then discuss what is it about these places that make for artful thinking. Presenter: Kevin Sutton
  • 1:30 PM

    • No workshops were found matching your selected topic
    • The Human Becoming Theory: The Was, Is, and Will Be… in Mental Health Professor Diane Smith and the students of NURS 380 | Ramaker Center (RMK 202) | 30 Minutes With the theme of “The Art of Courage”, we have looked into the use of art as therapy. During our presentation we will talk about different methods of art therapy. This will include actual hands on activity during our presentation. Our basis for the presentation is evidence based practice articles and from an interview of an art therapist from Sioux City. We will be sculpting with Play Doh and exploring the art of nursing. Presenters: Lucy Cardamone, Ally Fabrie, Krista Hamm, Rachel Lee, Amber McNeill, Maddie Miller, Karlie Schut
  • 2:00 PM

    • No workshops were found matching your selected topic
    • Colors of Snow Simms, Mavis | Art Building (TGK 103) | 20 Minutes (Repeated at 3 p.m.) Mavis Simms was born in Northern Minnesota and grew up working with textiles for utilitarian purposes. In 2010 she began experimenting with several processes of hand dying fabric. More recently she started “Snow dyeing” and has been thrilled with the unpredictable, yet eye-catching results. Her work is predominantly natural fibers but she also enjoys repurposing vintage pieces.  Some of these are embellished with beading.  She is always amazed to see the combination of colors in the fabric as a result of this process and no two pieces are ever the same.  Her focus is using this dyed fabric to create one of a kind wall art in several diverse ways and is continues to be inspired by other artists and every day things around her. 
    • Courageous Storytelling Beyer, Amber | Ramaker Center (Fireside Room) Amber Beyer, Abby Bliss, Justine Johnson, Michael Johnson, Abby McCubbin, Julia Van Dyk, and Logan Wright will be sharing our stories of lonliness. These stories are meant to empower those people who have also struggled with these things and inform others how to better walk alongside loved ones who struggle with these things. Everyone has times where they have felt alone and our goal is that our stories will empower others to tell their stories as well.
    • Music of the Great War Professor Josselyn-Cranson and the students of MUS 412 | Music Building (Choir room) | 45 Minutes During times of war, musicians are called upon to voice the feelings of the people as well as to direct those feelings.  The composers who lived and wrote during the Great War (1914 – 1918) exhibited artistic courage in a variety of ways.  Some, such as John Philip Sousa and Irving Berlin, encouraged patriotism and service of the country.  Others, such as Alfredo Casella and Claude Debussy, mourned the destruction that the war caused.  Maurice Ravel uses his music to honor fallen soldiers, while Al Piantadosi and Alfred Bryan raise the question of whether young men should be sent to kill “some other mother’s darling boy.”  In each case, the war and its musical responses call for courage: the courage to face grief and loss, the courage to voice protest against the war, and the courage to put oneself in the trenches of World War I.  This lecture-recital will present information about and performances of seven piece of music from the Great War. Presenters: Andrew Currier, Jeanie Fairchild, Matthew Honken, Heather Josselyn-Cranson
    • Psychology and Music: Experiencing and Understanding Music Feenstra, Jen | Learning Commons (Vogel B) | 1 Hour Psychologists have long been interested in how people experience and understand the world around them. Music provides a window into the fascinating way humans make sense of the environment. In this presentation we will look at how music is perceived, organized, and understood by people, with brief examples from musical pieces. We will also look at how music affects people and why we like some music more than other music. Chickens, Calder sculptures, and a couple of monsters will also make an appearance.
    • The Human Becoming Theory: The Was, Is, and Will Be… in Mental Health Professor Diane Smith and the students of NURS 380 | Ramaker Center (RMK 202) | 30 Minutes Our group of nursing students is going to do collage art therapy. We will teach some about why collages are used, what they mean, and the benefits of art therapy. The participants will be asked to do a collage and participate in the art therapy. This is a good non-verbal therapy and stress reliever. Then once this is done we will teach about the different forms of art therapy. This therapy is important for Christian nurses and is beneficial to the participants. Presenters: Callie Buske, Melinda Raak, Lexi Regnerus, Grace Ristow, Amber Sandbulte, Jenna Zandstra
    • Trying to See Through Dim Eyes Robinson, Eric | Art Building (TGK Gallery) | 30 Minutes Robinson’s show, titled “Trying to See Through Dim Eyes,” will consist of artwork produced primarily by hand carving and printing from woodcut matrices during the past five years. The exhibition will feature variations of two paintings by Vincent Van Gogh of a sower broadcasting seed and another series of variations exploring the content of the Bible’s book of Job. There will also be many works from a series of miniature prints Robinson calls “Fragments.”
  • 3:00 PM

    • No workshops were found matching your selected topic
    • Colors of Snow Simms, Mavis | Art Building (TGK 103) | 20 Minutes Mavis Simms was born in Northern Minnesota and grew up working with textiles for utilitarian purposes. In 2010 she began experimenting with several processes of hand dying fabric. More recently she started “Snow dyeing” and has been thrilled with the unpredictable, yet eye-catching results. Her work is predominantly natural fibers but she also enjoys repurposing vintage pieces.  Some of these are embellished with beading.  She is always amazed to see the combination of colors in the fabric as a result of this process and no two pieces are ever the same.  Her focus is using this dyed fabric to create one of a kind wall art in several diverse ways and is continues to be inspired by other artists and every day things around her. 
    • Courageous Visual Engagement: why should I look at this? Katlyn Loeschen, Lyric Morris, Kali Wolkow | Learning Commons (Vogel A) | 50 Minutes It is easy to dismiss contemporary art for its lack of obvious skill or confusingly abstract visual language. As it is, the average person spends roughly fifteen seconds looking at a work of art. But why should we engage with art outside of our comfort zones, and how do we do so? Presentations will spotlight the work of 20th century artists Arshile Gorky, Sol LeWitt, and John Cage, and offer reasons why their work is worth more than just a passing glance.
    • Grace Notes: Stories of Surprise, Regret, and Redemption Hubbard, Bob | Theatre Building (Proscenium) | 50 Minutes In "Grace Notes: Stories of Surprise, Regret, and Redemption” Robert Hubbard mingles traditions of storytelling and performance art. This earthy autobio-graphical one-person show consists of multiple stories in which a flash of grace shines through the cracks of otherwise desperate or broken situations.
    • Pour Over:Dutchman's Puzzle Drissell, Matt | Old Factory (Old Factory) | 1 Hour For this project, I have created a work that incorporates elements of quilting, illustration, and abstraction, crafted with food products and industrial paints (coffee grounds, egg shells, tractor enamel, urethane). These means suggest food, land use, industrialization, sustainability, and community; the clashing imagery evoking the complications that arise when these issues mix. The work also evokes a traditional storefront sign signaling that these conversations are welcomed at the Old Factory Coffee Shop, perhaps best with warm beverage and pastry.
    • The Cruci Project Dahn, Luke, et al | Ramaker Center (North Foyer) | 45 Minutes The Cruci Project is an interdisciplinary event involving visual art, music and poetry. Six student, faculty and guest composers, and three student and faculty poets were invited to compose new works and write new poems based on the same set of prints depicting the Crucifixion by Eric Robinson. The resulting music and poetry will be performed and read with the “Cruci” prints present for viewing. Printmaker: Eric Robinson. Composers: Luke Dahn, Heather Josselyn-Cranson, Andrew Currier, Scott Blasco, Ann Gebuhr, Jonathan Posthuma. Musicians: Pam De Haan, Anna Bartlett, Hannah McGarvey. Poets: Samuel Martin, Trevor Delamater, Sarah Shapiro. Reader: Samuel Martin.
  • 4:00 PM

    • No workshops were found matching your selected topic
    • Slam Poetry: \"Becoming Papa"\ Mahr, Steve | Old Factory (Old Factory) | 45 Minutes Children like fog horns in the early pre-dawn beckon and I dream of sleeping.  And then they sneak in, curling their warm restless bodies into my last empty pockets and I cannot help but welcome them. Oh the wild ones, they poem themselves into words I hurl out the window, howling to those passing by, we got a thick timber of chaos up in here and the beat is dropping. What is your poem? What beat bumps beneath you? Discover the way you echo. Explore your poetic voice. Listen to the erratic rumble of Steve Mahr rambling about life and death and being a Papa. You are a burning sun, come learn how to write your light into the eternal song of the universe—we are all waiting to hear it. Steve Mahr kissed a pretty lady in Chicago, married her beneath some Iowa trees and then made several tiny creatures with her using magic. He lives with his pack of wild things and rabble rouses whenever he gets the chance.
    • The Art of Ensemble Communication McGarvey, Tim | Music Building (Christ Chapel) | 75 Minutes Experience what it is like to sit in the ensemble and see and hear it from the players’ perspective. Experience the rehearsal communication that is essential in collaborative music making. Attendees can choose where in the ensemble to sit and experience the sound and interaction of those around them. We will also be demonstrating a new and innovative technique in large ensemble rehearsals where every member has an equal voice and there is no conductor or leader. People will experience how 42 musicians collaborate and work to an artistic end. The Northwestern College Symphonic Band is an excellent ensemble known for its performances of new and traditional repertoire. The Symphonic Band has performed all over the continental U.S. and in the countries of Cuba, Mexico, Venezuela and Ukraine. It has performed with top professional ensembles in each of these countries. Tim McGarvey serves as the Director of Bands, Coordinator of Instrumental Music Education, and teaches conducting and horn.
    • The Neuroscience of Arts and the Art of Neuroscience Davis, Ralph | Learning Commons (Vogel B) | 75 Minutes Three students will offer presentations as the centerpiece of a program that looks at how neuroscience and the arts inform and are related to one another. Their presentations were originally given last semester in the new interdisciplinary Brain and Behavior course (BIO 150SN). Some background on neuroscience will also be provided, highlighting the beauty of the nervous system. We will consider the art our nervous systems create and the art they themselves are. CLAUDIA BOMGAARS, a senior Northwestern College student, is majoring in art. Claudia is from Colombia and is interested in pursuing a master's degree in counseling and art therapy after college. She will offer a presentation on the Neuroscience of Art, with emphasis on how neuroscience relates to the visual arts. MEGAN VIPOND is a senior theatre major at Northwestern, and she can think of no better way to spend life. She hopes to open her own theatre someday in a place where it isn't readily available, in order to give kids a place to feel comfortable and grow into themselves. She will offer a presentation on Theatre and Neuroscience, with emphasis on how neuroscience relates to theatre and performance. ANTHONY WUBBEN, a senior Northwestern College student is currently pursuing a degree in social work. His future plans are to work as a hospital (medical) social worker with a life goal of receiving a master’s degree in social work. He will offer a presentation on Creativity and Neuroscience, with emphasis on neuroscience as related to the connections between creativity and neuropathology. RALPH DAVIS teaches in the biology department and directs the unique interdisciplinary Neuroscience and Persons (NAPs) Program here at Northwestern College. (He likes to say that everyone should take NAPs; he does whenever he gets a chance, e.g., on Sunday afternoons.) Last fall he had the pleasure of teaching the first offering of a new Integrated General Education course in the Science and the Natural World category called “Brain and Behavior” (BIO 150SN), a course in the NAPs Program. In that course he heard wonderful student presentations on the relationship of neuroscience to many areas of our lives as persons. Here we offer three of those presentations relevant to this year’s DLC theme on the Art of Courage. Davis will provide a brief introduction as well as some spectacular images of the nervous system made possible by new neurotechnologies, something he likes to think of as an aspect of the art of neuroscience.
    • Trying to See Through Dim Eyes Robinson, Eric | Art Building (TGK Gallery) | 30 Minutes Robinson’s show, titled “Trying to See Through Dim Eyes,” will consist of artwork produced primarily by hand carving and printing from woodcut matrices during the past five years. The exhibition will feature variations of two paintings by Vincent Van Gogh of a sower broadcasting seed and another series of variations exploring the content of the Bible’s book of Job. There will also be many works from a series of miniature prints Robinson calls “Fragments.”
  • All Day

    • No workshops were found matching your selected topic
    • Box: En Route Stokes, Emily | Theatre Building (TAC Lobby) | All Day Emily's exhibit is a wooden box that has been painted and collaged, and, when opened, reveals a foldout relief print. The imagery relates to rural Iowa.
    • Clay Critters Simpson, Michelle | Theatre Building (TAC Rotunda) | All Day I've always enjoyed cartooning, and have amassed many whimsical critters on paper over the years. At a certain point it occurred to me that it might be fun to bring them to life by sculpting them out of polymer clay, so I went for it. Each animal has been molded and textured by hand, and then baked in a standard oven. They are all a product of my overly active imagination.
    • DLC Art Work: Self-Guided Tour Langton, Sherri | Learning Commons (Reference Desk) | 0 In 2013, while DeWitt Learning Commons was being built, particular attention was paid to the artwork that would adorn and complement the building. For this event, pick up a brochure in the Learning Commons and embark on a self-guided tour of the art in the building. You’ll have the chance to explore 29 unique pieces of art, reflecting on each design and its message.
    • Inside the Box: A Placemaking Project Morris, Lyric | Ramaker Center (N/S Hallway) | All Day Lyric's project is entitled "Inside the Box" and focuses on the concept of Placemaking. Placemaking is the idea of "capitalizing on a local community's assets, inspiration, and potential, with the intention of creating public spaces that promote people's health, happiness, and well being. " Students are invited to stop in the Ramaker Hallway throughout the day to help Lyric create a space that focuses on using all of the community members of NWC's identities to create a community space that people take ownership and creative freedom of. Lyric Morris is a senior art/graphic design major at Northwestern College. After interning with an art residency and public arts organization last summer, she developed a passion for using art as a tool to bring communities together and promote creative problem-solving and identity-formation.
    • Memory Erased Johnson, Justine | Ramaker Center (South Foyer) | All Day A young woman sees memories of her father through a window and is moved by the images she observes. But when she attempts to enter the memories through a nearby door, the images are lost. What has passed, we cannot change. What is untouchable can still foster valuable lessons. Justine Johnson is a junior Writing and Rhetoric major with a minor in Journalism, but her passion is for telling stories that matter through film. She is currently working with a team on campus to tell redemptive stories about hidden struggles in the six-part short film series "TENTS: Something Built Together," which is scheduled to begin releasing on March 12.
    • The Art of Courage and the Netherlands Anderson, Doug | Learning Commons (Learning Commons, Lower Level, Archives) | All Day Doug Anderson, Professor Emeritus of History and currently part-time NWC Archivist and Reference Librarian, has assembled a two-part Netherlands exhibit in the archives display case, DeWitt Library, LL. The chronologically earliest part of the exhibit is of engravings in 4 Statenbijbels (State Bibles; 1690, 1719, 1728, and 1748). The second part of the exhibit is of samples of the anti-Nazi cartoon art of L.J. Jordaan (1885-1980) for the Dutch weekly De Groene Amsterdammer (The Green Amsterdammer).
    • Title: Home Edman, Sally | Ramaker Center (Ramaker Upstairs Balcony) | 45 Minutes While virtually none of these photos was taken in Orange City or in Iowa, they do represent the larger home I am privileged to inhabit. Traveling reminds me not to draw my boundaries too narrowly, or with a very thick line. These pilgrimages teach me that I can experience new and different people, customs, and vistas while also still being /“at home./” Travel enlarges my vision, my understanding, and my sense of family as I discover I can be /“ home”/ wherever I find myself in the world. The photos in this collection were taken in places from Arizona to Istanbul, San Francisco to Venice, and Cappadocia to Michigan. I am a self-taught photographer motivated to try to capture some of the beauty I feel privileged to see in the world. In landscapes, people, animals and foliage creation teaches us about, and reminds us of, the Creator. I photograph them because the process of doing so encourages me to notice and be grateful for the beauty around me in a different way, and allows me to remember and enjoy it again much later.
    • Trying to See Through Dim Eyes Robinson, Eric | Art Building (TGK Gallery) | All Day Robinson’s show, titled “Trying to See Through Dim Eyes,” will consist of artwork produced primarily by hand carving and printing from woodcut matrices during the past five years. The exhibition will feature variations of two paintings by Vincent Van Gogh of a sower broadcasting seed and another series of variations exploring the content of the Bible’s book of Job. There will also be many works from a series of miniature prints Robinson calls “Fragments.”
    • Untitled - Scorza Scorza, Phil | Music Building (PAC Lobby) | All Day Professor Scorza’s interests and experience lie in the area of graphic design and photography. He teaches Introduction to Studio, photography and the graphic design courses for the department. A former Northwestern College student, he earned a bachelor’s degree in graphic design from Iowa State and a Master of Fine Arts from Lesley University College of Art and Design. Prior to joining Northwestern's faculty, he established a career as a graphic designer and creative director for over 20 years, both in the corporate setting and as a freelancer. He frequently uses his art to serve nonprofit and community-based organizations.
    • Untitled - Shin Shin, Yun | Music Building (PAC Lobby) | All Day Yun Shin is an art professor at Northwestern College and teaches Ceramics, Sculpture and Painting. She uses oil paint as a material that starts to saturate through paper and creates a translucent image on the backside. It is ethereal and stained with memory.
    • Untitled - Van Es Van Es, Kim | Ramaker Center (Upstairs Balcony) | All Day Kim Van Es has been an amateur photographer since about age 10. Her results improved due to photography tips from her high school yearbook advisor, Carl Vandermeulen. Through both writing and photography, Van Es attempts to capture a moment in time lest she forget its significance. On a beautiful Saturday in September, she tagged along with Dr. Ann Lundberg’s Writing Nature class on a field trip to Blue Mounds State Park near Luverne, Minnesota. During two precious hours all by herself, Van Es used various settings on her Canon Rebel T3i to preserve discoveries of the day.